Salt

12 Jan

I was thrilled to get something new to cook with for Christmas.  I love to try new cooking techniques, new recipes, and new ingredients (remember last fall when I declared pumpkin was the new bacon?  I used it in everything for weeks!).  Things like this really get my creative juices flowing.  I was jazzed!

These were not the kind of salt blocks I was accustomed to growing up in the midwest.  We used to get big white blocks of salt at the grocery store to add to the water softener in a (dark and scary, if my childhood memories serve me right!) corner of the basement.  Chicago and its suburbs had hard water, which made using water a bit less efficient in some cases.  Large salt blocks and a water softener are de rigueur with hard water.  No…the salt blocks I received are different from the salt blocks of my childhood. But I digress.

These Tibetan salt blocks have a lovely patina, are about 1 1/2 to 2 inches thick, and can serve a couple of purposes (foodie snobs like myself expect kitchen stuff to do many jobs).   The Tibetan salt blocks can be used for cooking as well as for a lovely presentation of food.  Since the winter weather is chilly here, I am starting with cooking on my salt.  More to come on serving with them…

I started heating my salt slowly to about 500 degrees over 30 minutes.

I started heating my salt slowly to about 500 degrees over 30 minutes.

I hit the internet.  How, exactly, do you cook with these blocks I wondered.  Well it turned out to be pretty simple.  The blocks can go right onto a stove or grill burner to heat and cook.  So that is what I did.  The salt needs to heat slowly, and get to a temperature of about 500 degrees over the course of about 30 minutes.  Easy enough.

Recipes to cook on salt were surprisingly plentiful.  Everything from steak to scallops can be cooked on them.  But being health minded, I was concerned about the salt content of food cooked on salt.  Turns out I didn’t need to be.  The salt blocks impart little salt during cooking.  Considering the amount of salt in prepared foods, cooking something fresh and salt free on salt is certainly an option!  I discovered that using them occasionally for those of us watching our sodium but not on sodium restricted diets is just fine.

Armed with this information, off I went!  When trying something new, I am cautious with ingredients.  I was not going to start this experiment with an expensive cut of meat or piece of fish.  I began with a small piece of flank steak.  I ordered it freshly cut from my butcher.  When preparing to cook it, I began heating the salt blocks and  sliced the steak into thin strips.  I did not season the meat at all because I wanted the full experience of the salt flavors on the steak.  When the blocks were hot onto the salt it went.

The steak hit the salt and immediately began sizzling.  Family gathered around to witness the fantastic scents that

On to the salt the steak went.  It began sizzling the second it hit the salt!

On to the salt the steak went. It began sizzling the second it hit the salt!

began wafting through the house.  Oooohs and aaahhhhs followed.  It was my Oscar moment (so few and far between for me are these moments that when it happens I preen like a peacock…ridiculous I know!  Damn pride!).  The steak began noticeably browning, and with a preference for medium rare

The meat sizzled and cooked beautifully!

The meat sizzled and cooked beautifully!cooked steak, I flipped the pieces over after only about 30 seconds.  The sizzling continued.

steak, I flipped the pieces over after only about 30 seconds.  The sizzling continued.

I had a large dinner heading to the table, with the steak being simply an accoutrement to the meal.  It was an all inclusive experiment, as everyone at the table got one or two pieces of steak to taste.  The excitement built as the steak was tender to cut.  And to our delight the flavor was outstanding!  It was a two thumbs up night!  The steak was a hit.  Now my question is what to cook next on my salt blocks.  I think it will be sea scallops but I will let you know!

A quick word about serving on these salt blocks.  I found suggestions to serve produce that folks like to salt, such as melon and tomatoes, on the blocks.  You simply slice up a melon, for example, and lay the pieces on the salt block.  The melon will absorb a bit of salt producing a juicy salty sweet hot weather treat.  I can’t wait to try that, but it will have to wait until summer rolls around for that one.  Until then, I am going to continue to experiment cooking with my blocks.  I will keep you posted on my progress!  Bon appetite!

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