Tag Archives: cumin

Seven Super Spices Wrapup

7 Jan

Okay, we have had fun talking about spices.  The seven super spices we discovered (or rediscovered) are cumin, cinnamon, oregano, ginger, turmeric, sage, and clove.  There has been time to process information about these super spices and start using them.  Adding them to food has so many benefits.  Making foods with spices, such as ginger tea, is also a way to take steps toward better health.  Lets just take a quick peek at the general benefits of using spices.

  • Spices are a concentrated form of antioxidants.  Antioxidants, at the very core, protect cells from damage.  Cells are the building blocks on which we rely for our body to perform at its best.  Antioxidants allow us to build a better wellness foundation from the inside out!
  • Many spices have anti inflammatory properties.  This can allow our bodies to naturally decrease pain from inflammation, such as arthritic pain.
  • Many spices have beneficial fiber-a great way to help cleanse the body.
  • Spices are naturally vitamin and mineral rich in a concentrated form.
  • Some spices can be used to relieve nausea.
  • Many spices are beneficial to the digestive system.  They promote positive gastrointestinal activity.
  • Spices add savory flavors to food, encouraging healthier eating habits.
  • Some spices help regulate blood sugar, a big plus for diabetics.

They are simple to add to your daily diet, and can immediately benefit from their medicinal properties.  It can be as simple as this: Make a dry meat rub by mixing 1 tablespoon each of basil, oregano, parsley, rosemary, and thyme.  Toss these spices into a bowl, mix them up a bit, and rub them on pork or chicken.  Spritz the meat with a bit of olive oil and bake.  Easy Peasy!

There is our series, and our wrap-up.  Let me know how you are adding spices to your cooking!

Seven Super Spices-Mission Accomplished!

29 Dec

Busymomswellnesss has been on a mission to get more spices in use in our kitchens.  The benefits of spices are undeniable, and hey…who doesn’t need a kick in the wellness pants every now and again?  Spices, all plant based, provide a wonderful flavor punch to food, are loaded with beneficial antioxidants, and they have medicinal healing properties.  Adding spices to our food can have a big impact on overall good health.

Cumin, cinnamon, oregano, ginger, turmeric and sage have been covered in this series of super spices.  Time to move along to the seventh and final spice.  Remember, though, while these spices are fantastic, do not be limited by these seven.  Use them as a springboard to inspire planning, cooking, and discovering new flavors.  Allow these seven fabulous spices to expand the palate and mind.  That said, the seventh super spice to discover, rediscover, and use is…clove!

For quite some time I thought clove was either an “artsy” cigarette that was super cool (what can I say?  I have never been a smoker!) or something poking out of a ham.  Yikes!  Did I really just admit to that level of ignorance?  Ugh!  Good news though.  I have now moved far beyond that in the quest to increase wellness through an in-depth second look at super spices.

Cloves, like all spices, have positive effects on wellbeing.  How so?  Cloves have been used for healing in Indonesian and Chinese medicine for centuries, a tradition that continues today.  Cloves have been attributed with the ability to relieve everything from an earache to toothaches.  They are great for gastrointestinal disorders and upset, such as nausea.  They reduce hypertension.  Cloves can he;p reduce inflammation related to arthritis.

From a nutritional standpoint, cloves are a good source of fiber.  They are also rich in vitamin C, important for tissue repair in the body, and vitamin K.  Vitamin K is essential for blood clotting.  Cloves are a great source of manganese, which is beneficial for bone health, regulating blood sugar, and helps thyroid function.  The list goes on.   There is no downside here folks.

Cloves are buds from an evergreen tree that is indigenous to Indonesia.  They are available to use in three forms:  whole, powder, and oil.   As you can imagine, they have the same benefits but are used differently.  Whole cloves are woody and used in many dishes, but often removed prior to consumption.   Cloves in powder form are often added to sweet dishes, such as muffins, and savory dishes like sweet potato casserole.  Clove oil is a natural remedy for infections and pain.  It is widely used, but since oil is concentrated, it must be used in moderation.

To get started, try this simple stewed fruit recipe. 

Stewed Fruit

  • 2 apples or pears, peeled and cubed
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 4 cloves
  • 3-4 cups water

Place the chopped apples or pears, sugar, cloves and water in a medium-sized pot and cook on medium heat till the apples are soft. Drain and remove cloves.   Toss them warm onto oatmeal for a hearty breakfast or allow them to cool and add them to your favorite low fat low sugar yogurt.  Isn’t it time to see what wonderful dishes you can discover with cloves?  Bon appetite!

Seven super spices-Let’s keep going!

18 Nov

So far we have covered 2 super spices.  Let’s take a break from discussing the savory brown spices of cumin and cinnamon and move on to a spice that boasts other fabulous benefits.  We go to the  green…and the third super spice is oregano!  Yum!

Not only has oregano been used in culinary circles for ages, it has been used as an herb with medicinal properties for thousands of years.  Surprise!  It actually belongs to the mint family.   In addition to its flavorful pop to so many dishes, it is great for the body too!

First and foremost, oregano is very high in dietary antioxidants.  Antioxidants are beneficial for our bodies because they boost the immune system, help promote healthy cells, and defend against free radicals.  Free radicals attack the cells in our bodies every chance they get.  It is oxygen based damage to the cell structure, so we need to protection.   Antioxidants are a good defense from free radicals.   Each antioxidant has different beneficial qualities, so getting them from different dietary sources is beneficial not only to our cells but our immune system as well.

Oregano also has been found to have anti-bacterial properties.  Oregano oil is touted as a germ killer.  Some studies have shown that a few drops of oregano oil can actually cut down on infections in the house hold.  Compelling studies worth mentioning!

Oregano is a rich source of vitamin K.  This is valuable to bone growth and bone density.  And here is a surprise…oregano is also rich in fiber.  We tend to not consider spices when thinking of fiber, but it is time to change that thinking!

Oregano, like most spices, is best fresh.  When storing fresh oregano, it should be wrapped and stored in the fridge.  Dried oregano should be kept in a tightly sealed glass container.  Try to keep not only this, but all dried spices in a cool dark part of your kitchen, like a cabinet away from the heat of the oven.  Buy it in small amounts because spices should not be in your cabinet longer than 6 months.

Oregano is typically associated with greek and italian cooking, but its great with most anything.    Try making a dry rub with oregano, parsley, basil, thyme and rosemary.  Pat on dry chicken or pork prior to cooking for a nice flavorful dish.  Add it to tomato sauces too.  Lots of folks sprinkle oregano on their pizza.  Put a dusting of it on your fish.  Toss some into soup.  Add it to an omelet.  There are so many ways to enjoy oregano!

Spices are typically nutrient dense and calorie free. They are cholesterol free.  Why not dig in and start changing your recipes to include more spices!  It’s time to boost your immune system and add flavor to everyday dishes!  Start having fun with spices and you are on your way to better health!

Seven Super Spices

11 Nov

Spices are used to enhance the flavors of the food we cook.  But there is an added bonus!  Did you know that spices are packed with healthy antioxidants?  Spices, even in small amounts, can pack a good healthy punch in your daily diet.  How?

Antioxidants prevent oxidation.  How is that helpful to our bodies?  Oxidation harms our cells, and antioxidants protect our cells from the damage oxidation can cause.  That is why we hear so much about antioxidants today.  Where are antioxidants found and how can we incorporate them into our diet?  There are many ways.  Using spices is a good place to jump start your cells to better health!

Antioxidants in spices are super concentrated.  What are the best spices to focus on?  We will start with one at a time.  Let’s talk about cumin.  It is prized for medicinal healing.  But we will focus on what the studies have shown to make cumin medically beneficial.

  • Studies have shown cumin to help reduce glucose levels naturally in diabetics, increasing glucose sensitivity.
  • Cumin has been a proven bronchiodilator, beneficial for asthmatics.
  • It is packed with antioxidant properties.
  • Cumin contains iron and manganese, great for the immune system.
  • Cumin has been shown to benefit the digestive system by stimulating pancreatic enzymes.
  • Studies have indicated that cumin seeds may also have anti-carcinogenic properties.

Cumin seeds physically resemble caraway seeds.  Both the cumin seeds and the powder can be found in the grocery store.  The seeds are fresher, and can be toasted and easily crushed to use in any recipe.  But use which ever is best for you.

Cumin is generally associated with Mexican and Spanish foods.  It is also widely used in Mediterranean cooking.  You can throw it into your tacos, chili, or enchiladas.  Add cumin to black beans and rice.  Give your cauliflower a healthy punch by sprinkling it with cumin.  It doesn’t matter how you use it…just start!  You will quickly be in your way to better health!  And the next of the seven super spices is…

Crock pot tacos

15 Oct

I have been of the mindset that crock pot meals are:

a) SO 70’s, and not in a good way

b) SO boring

c)  SO bland, like beige food

d) decidedly and completely unsexy food

In other words, no F-U-N!

But…..I was short on time the other morning (as usual), and wanted to get a fairly decent meal on the table for my family that night.  So I took a minute before leaving for work and grabbed a couple of things to toss into the (time for true confessions…) crock pot.  My intention was to have flavorful and somewhat healthy tacos by suppertime.  So this is what i tossed into the crock pot:

4 frozen boneless skinless chicken breasts

1 can corn, drained

1 can black beans, drained and rinsed

1 can diced tomatoes, with juice

1 can diced green chilis

4 ounces salsa

4 ounces salsa verde (green salsa)

1 envelope of low sodium taco seasoning

1 T. chili powder

1 T. cumin

salt and pepper to taste (you can always adjust this upward, so be conservative to begin with)

I put the chicken in the bottom, then just dumped everything else on top.  I was in a hurry,  the chicken breasts were individual, not in a big block, but still frozen solid.  The seasonings went on the top.  I didn’t even stir it.  I just threw it together, covered the crock pot, turned it on and ran out the door.

When I came home in the late afternoon, I opened the lid of the crock pot and gave the mixture a good stir.  I used two forks to shred the chicken while it was still in the crock pot, which was so tender it easily broke apart.  I had a quick taste, adjusted my seasonings a bit, then put the lid back on.

When dinner time came, I made some spanish rice, shredded some lettuce and cheese, pulled the tortillas out, and dinner was served!  The tacos were kind of an all in one because of the vegetables  added to the mixture.  The dinner was nutritious and relatively low in fat.

This recipe really stretched my ingredients so it was budget friendly, and it served a crowd.  It was an easy weeknight dinner.  True it wasn’t sexy, but it wasn’t boring either.  With all of the added vegetables, it was colorful, flavorful, and quite satisfying.  What will you add to your crock pot tacos?