Tag Archives: vegetarian

Soup Time!

30 Dec

Cold weather is soup weather. When the chill sets in, the soup goes on. I decided to try making a soup I had never made before. And I wanted to make it from scratch. My darling Denis talked about his sister Kathy’s Italian Wedding Soup. He remembered it being quite delicious. Decision made.

Italian Wedding Soup has meatballs, so my first order of business after finding a recipe that I could start with (while making it my own) was to make meatballs. I used a couple of types of ground meat, bread crumbs, a beaten egg, and some italian seasoning. While some epicureans fry their meatballs, I bake mine. I cooked up a big batch so there were extra to put into the freezer for another day.

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While the meatballs were cooling, I assembled the rest of my ingredients. Cooked meatballs, chicken stock (both homemade and store bought), shredded carrots, celery, arugula and spinach, orzo, eggs, parmesan cheese, and finally salt and pepper were set to come together in one magnificent soup. The homemade chicken stock was loaded with succulent herbss-and would perfectly season the soup.

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Next I started chopping. I like everything ready when I begin making something, It just makes it easier to assemble.

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Just a little FYI…when I use celery in a recipe, I use both the outer stalks and the leafy insides. I don’t waste any flavorful tidbit when I cook.

Next I sautéed the carrots and celery in a little butter. Then I added the stock. My first  ever soup kettle of Italian Wedding Soup was underway. The tantalizing aromas floating through the house brought my darling Denis to the kitchen. One of the many things I love about cooking…the kitchen becomes an impromptu gathering place.

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The soup was bubbling away, and the scents wafting through the house made the frosty day outside fade away . Next, more building of the flavors when the chopped arugula and spinach went into the broth.

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Then it was time to froth up the eggs. When I add eggs to any recipe, they sit on the counter for about 20 minutes to come to room temperature before adding them to a recipe. Eggs work better in recipes when they are room temperature.

 

After whipping the eggs, I stirred the soup and slowly drizzled the eggs in-they cooked slowly as they were added. The soup was coming together beautifully.

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The house was filled with the warmth of bubbling soup.

In went the meatballs. They just had to be heated through and the soup was complete. Time to dig in!

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Freshly grated parmesan garnished the soup. Cripsy garlic bread completed the meal. While it was chilly outside, inside it was warm and oh so delicious.

Soup lends itself to personal csutomization. It can be easily tailored to taste. Love pepper? Grind some flavorful heat into the soup. Want more veggies? Chop them up and toss them in. Is vegetarian soup your preference? Use tofu and vegetable broth. Easy Peasy. Let your food express your personality and have fun!

 

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Edamame

22 Apr

Edawhat?  Edamame!  And it is time you try some!  Okay, so snobbish foodies are known for giving things fancy names.  Edamame is no exception.  They are simply green soybeans.  Or more accurately, young soybeans.  As asian staple for centuries, their popularity is picking up here in the good old US of A.  Which is great news for us!

Soy beans are a fruit that grow in a pod and considered a protein.  They are a legume. Besides soy, other legumes include peas, lentils, and beans.  They pack a wonderful nutritional punch.  And they are very versatile.  Soy beans, or edamame, can be prepared in so many ways!  But first, back to the nutrition.

Edamame can be beneficial to our health.  They are low in calories, and high in fiber.  Half a cup has about 9 grams of fiber (we should shoot for about 20-25 grams of fiber daily) and less than 8 grams of fat.  They are a good source of folate, vitamin k, manganese, and many other essential vitamins and minerals.  They are also low in sodium.  Fabulous news, right?

Now even more good news.  They can be prepared a million different ways!  They can be enjoyed “naked”, simply shelled and out of the package.  This is a fresh healthy way to eat edamame.  They can also be steamed with a little salt and used as a good plant protein for any meal.  Simple, quick and delicious.

Bring something new to your next get together.  Make a dip using edamame.  Introduce your friends to it, and become a hero with a savory new party food!  Alton Brown has a fabulous dip.  Here it is:

12 ounces shelled, cooked, and cooled edamame, about 2 cups, recipe follows
1/4 cup diced onion
1/2 cup tightly packed fresh cilantro or parsley leaves
1 large garlic clove, sliced
1/4 cup freshly squeezed lime or lemon juice
1 tablespoon brown miso
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon red chili paste
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
5 tablespoons olive oil

Place the edamame, onion, cilantro, garlic, lime juice, miso, salt, chili paste and pepper into the bowl of a food processor and process for 15 seconds. Stop to scrape down the sides of the bowl and process for another 15 to 20 seconds. With the processor running, slowly drizzle in the olive oil. Once all of the oil has been added, stop, scrape down the bowl and then process another 5 to 10 seconds. Taste and adjust seasoning, as desired. Serve with chips or crackers. Store in an airtight container for up to 5 days.

I have played with that recipe a little, and it is yummy!  I have also made an edamame cold dish for a dinner party when I was having both “meatatarians” and vegetarians at the same table.  I like to have several protein as well as vegetable options at my parties.  And it is easy peasy!  Here it is:

10 – 12 ounces shelled edamame (I buy them in the refrigerated produce section)

1 roasted red pepper (I have used these from a jar to save time)

1/4 cup each olive oil and vinegar of choice (i prefer balsamic, but your favorite vinegar will certainly do!)

1 clove fresh garlic, minced

salt and pepper to taste.

Cut the red pepper into thin strips, and mix all ingredients together.  Refrigerate for at least 4 hours.  Enjoy!

Like roasted chickpeas, edamame is also savory when roasted and makes a great snack.  Thaw some frozen edamame, drain on paper towels, toss them on a baking sheet and sprinkle a little olive oil over the top.  Next, add your favorite spices (but don’t forget the salt and pepper), and toss into a 400 degree oven for 40 minutes, stirring 2-3 times during roasting.  Warning: these are addictive!

As you can see, edamame will make a great addition to your diet.  Go ahead.  Try it.  And let me know your favorite way to enjoy this nutritionally packed food!